FILM PROGRAMS

Course Descriptions

*Please note that course offerings and course descriptions are subject to change. Please see the University Catalog for the most up to date information.

general education

Theology

  • Christian Experience I (Fundalmentals of Catholicism)

    This course examines foundational beliefs of the Catholic faith:  divine revelation and its sources, the role of faith, the Incarnation, Christ’s work of redemption, beliefs about Mary and the communion of saints, the nature and mission of the Church, and more. Focus is placed on connecting your faith to the study of theology and in developing a personal relationship with Christ.

  • Christian Experience II (Sacred Scripture and Sacraments)

    In this course students will examine Divine Revelation, concentrating specifically on God’s Revelation of His Love and Truth in Sacred Scripture.  Attention will be paid to the Covenants of the Old Testament and how these lead to the fulfillment of those Covenants in the person and mission and Paschal Mystery of Jesus Christ.

  • Christian Experience III (Mission and Morality)

    This course offers students an in-depth study of the sacraments, liturgy, spirituality and prayer. The course examines the challenges of developing an interior life, focusing on the nature and difficulties of prayer. In addition, students analyze the Church’s liturgical life, with a focus on the seven sacraments by studying the Catechism and spiritual masters.

  • Christian Experience IV (Theology of the Body)

    In this course, students will come to appreciate their own lived experience of God’s design for human life.  Students will examine the moral imperatives that result from their own bodily existence and how these honor the dignity of those around them and guide them in their own loving service to others in the pursuit of their vocations.

Philosophy

  • Philosophy of Man

    After providing an overview of the basic principles of the Philosophy of Nature, this course examines the nature of the human being, beginning from the Epic of Gilgamesh, continuing through the Classical period by means of Aristotle, the Middle Ages in St. Thomas Aquinas, the Renaissance via Blaise Pascal, and concluding in the modern period in Nietzsche, Freud and T. S. Eliot.

  • Philosophy of Nature

    This course is a detailed study in the various understandings of nature, beginning from the mythology of the Enuma Elish as a primitive attempt at grasping the world, to the classical understanding found in Aristotle’s Physics and 141 Parts of Animals and their Medieval development in Thomas Aquinas’s The Principles of Nature, to foundational texts in modern natural sciences such as those of Descartes, Galileo and Newton, to discussions of evolution found in Darwin, and finally to near contemporary physicists such as Heisenberg. The contrast between the classical stress on substantial form and formal causality and the modern method of material causality and mathematical law will be brought to the forefront, as will the emphasis on technology as a mastery of nature in modern science and the question of teleology, whether nature acts for a purpose.

  • Philosophy of God

    This is a course in the various understandings of metaphysics, or the nature of being as being, beginning from Plato’s Timaeus, continuing through the Classical period by means of Aristotle, and the Middle Ages in St. Thomas Aquinas. The course continues by covering several related questions, beginning with Natural Theology (discussing the traditional proofs for the existence of God, the Divine Attributes that can be understood using reason alone, the analogy of being, and the act of creation), continuing with the “problem of evil” and the question of free will

  • Logic

    Students learn about the basic structures of sound reasoning, focusing largely on classic Aristotelian logic. The course serves to help students think and argue with clarity as well as to effectively analyze arguments of others.  The course includes a careful analysis of the operations of the intellect, i.e., understanding, judgment, and reasoning, focusing on their products, i.e., term, proposition, and syllogism.

Humanities

  • Cultural Foundations I

    As this course engages apparently timeless literary works from the classical tradition, it situates them within specific historical contexts.  This approach enables students to better appreciate the enduring power of story even as they recognize the complex relationship art to its surrounding culture.  Masterworks of pagan antiquity (Homer and/or Virgil) give way to key texts of early Christendom (Augustine, Beowulf, and others) in order to further illuminate the impact of Christian theology and anthropology on artists and thinkers in myriad disciplines.

  • Cultural Foundations II

    This course tracks the development in European art and thought during the transition from the High Middle Ages to the Renaissance.  Special attention is paid at the outset to the tensions arising from, surrounding, and even bringing about this epochal shift, especially as evidenced in Dante’s Divine Comedy.  When the course later shifts its focus to texts produced by Shakespeare and other authors in Renaissance England, students find these tensions now located in increasingly realistic and complex human figures and dramas.  Through these explorations students come to see the distinctive groundwork being laid for what will later be recognized as the modern period.

  • Cultural Foundations III

    This third course in our Cultural Foundations series tracks the rise of modernity against the backdrop of various 18th and 19th century upheavals.  In order to best appreciate the dynamism and complexity of this period, students will immerse themselves in the literary form most characteristic of the 19th century: the novel.  By applying order to an increasingly dissonant world, the great novels of the European tradition illuminate daily life amidst revolutionary change in a uniquely personal way, and they capture in their progress both the subtlest movements of human consciousness and the most profound transformations of human hearts.

  • World History and Culture

    At the highest level, the course looks at how nations and regions across the world are navigating the tumultuous currents of globalization.

  • College Writing I *

    This course will emphasize the use of correct grammar, usage, spelling, punctuation, and mechanics. Students will be required to apply these skills to writing assignments.

  • Culture Making and Aesthetics*

    This course examines how media and business shape the attitudes, practices and beliefs of individuals and groups, and develops in students a rich understanding of the subtle and powerful cultural currents swirling around them, so that they can make valuable contributions to the development of future cultures. Students will consider critically how media and business shape them, learning to recognize the attitudes, assumptions, arguments and ideas promoted by media and business enterprises and products. They will develop a full, thoughtful and practical understanding of what cultures are and how they grow, and of the university’s mission to impact culture for Christ. They will gain an understanding of how Christians are perceived by the cultures around them, and appreciate how one gains the privilege of participation in the shaping of cultures. Finally, students will learn to articulate what of value they have to offer the cultures around them, and how they hope to make that contribution over the course of their lives and careers.

  • College Writing II

    This course will build on the skills learned in College Writing I.

* Must take one of these two courses

Science and Mathematics

  • Decisions Based on Data (Math)

    This course is a review of basic mathematical skills, with a focus on those needed to review and understand business statistics and information. The course focuses on real life application of the concepts learned.

     

    Students will also be introduced to basic financial literacy concepts such as budgeting and planning for large purchases that require a loan. The course is also designed to help students learn how to interpret quantitative information and other data in order to make decisions.

  • Natural Science

    This course explores the scientific method and reasoning. A special emphasis is placed on the design found in nature and environmental science.

Business

  • Entrepreneurial Thinking

    In today’s world there is a need for strategic thinking and business vision based on a different paradigm. Competition is not only between products and services, but also between business models. Students will learn about innovation-driven business strategies and methodologies to develop business designs to successfully compete in the new economy.

  • Introduction to Marketing

    This course focuses on introducing the idea of “entrepreneurial marketing” and is aimed at students who plan to start a new venture or take a job as a marketing professional pursuing an innovative marketing approach. Students will study a full spectrum of marketing strategies and tactics that are especially suitable for entrepreneurial firms aiming for high growth and innovation yet faced by limited resources and uncertain industry dynamics.

     

    Students will work in teams on marketing plans for their own venture or for other high profile entrepreneurs or executives. The focus of this course is on hands-on experiences and practical application of marketing concepts.

  • Business Planning

    In this class students get a “big picture” look at the ingredients of a start-up firm and the process of creating one. The class details those ingredients, discusses the stories (good & bad) of people who have done it, and learn the process by going through it with a team. Students learn the business planning process, how to craft a compelling and clear business story, and acquire inquisitiveness as to how the world of business really works.

     

    The class deliverable is a complete Business Plan created by student teams along with a presentation of the plan.

  • Negotiation Skills

    This course teaches students to meet and resolve objections and conflicts that result from written and oral proposals and pitches. Emphasis is on resolving customer obstacles before addressing your own. Topics covered include: Wants vs. Needs; Win-Win Strategies; Best Alternatives to Agreement; Schedule vs. Quality vs. Cost; Progress vs. Perfection. The class progresses through carefully structured, progressively more complex negotiation exercises. Students learn how external and internal negotiation has become a way of life for effective managers in a constantly changing business environment.

  • Social Media Marketing

    This course will prepare you to act both strategically and tactically –utilizing social media tools like blogs, microblogs (Twitter), vodcasts, video, and networking sites to engage with your audience and sell your products and services. You will discover how to use analytic tools to gauge the effectiveness of your campaigns and communicate meaningfully with your audience. In this class, we will divide into small groups. Each group will build their own blog, as well as two accompanying social media accounts (Twitter & Facebook) for their chosen “business,” and we will analyze their implementation & progress.

  • Leadership and Management

    This course gives an in-depth understanding of the differences between – and similarities of – leadership and management. The course focuses on the major traits of leaders and managers, and augments these with examples of great historic leaders, including George Custer and Jesus Christ.

     

    The course also studies the leadership traits of Abraham Lincoln, and looks at how these can be applied in business to improve management techniques.

  • Business Communications

    This course will teach students how to write and speak effectively in business and other communication.

media core

  • ENTM 101 - Story, Genre, and Structure

    A theoretical and practical introduction to the human phenomenon of storytelling, what stories are, their central role in culture from ancient times to the present day, and how storytellers seek and communicate meaning. Particular attention will be paid to the significance of story in the Judeo-Christian tradition and story’s role within the Christian faith.

    Students will generate numerous story ideas, and with the help of their classmates and the instructor will evaluate those ideas in terms of audience appeal, theme and meaning.

  • ENTM 207 - Film Criticism & the Art of Visual Storytelling

    This class will study some of the most important and influential films in American cinema to understand the cultural context in which they were created, the role of the director in the film making process, and the lasting legacy that the various films enjoy.

  • ENTM 421 - Career Strategies

    In this course students identify their specialized interest and value within the media industry, and through the creation of a comprehensive career strategy, use specialized knowledge, skills and experience to prepare themselves to be hired by media companies and promote themselves within the media industry. The class will also look at the unique world of freelancing and give students the tools necessary to venture into self-employment.

  • ENTM 102 - Media Survey

    This course introduces students to the diverse world of radio, television, news, cinema, internet, print and advertising. Students will learn how to critically experience such media and analyze its desired results. Students will also explore how media has developed and evolved through history and examine the current influences of media on society from a cultural, artistic and economic perspective. In addition, we will explore what the role of Christians in this new media environment can and should be, and how we can best utilize the opportunities available to us to become who we want to be.

  • ENTM 410 - Media Law and Ethics

    The course examines the legal relationships in the motion picture and television industries, as well as the legal relationships between artists and their personal managers. It covers the key legal principles that are involved in most media productions. This includes with trade unions, licensing, intellectual property and contract issues. In addition, this course explores ethical challenges students are likely to encounter working in entertainment and guides them through the development of a personal code of ethics that is informed by the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

  • ENTM 490 - Senior Project I: Pre-Production *

    The senior project is a series of courses (up to three) in which students will work either individually or as part of a team and create or contribute to a significant media project that spotlights their area of emphasis. Class I is the pre-production phase. Instructor approval is required to take this class.

  • ENTM 492 - Senior Project III: Post-Production *

    The senior project is a series of courses (up to three) in which students will work either individually or as part of a team and create or contribute to a significant media project that spotlights their area of emphasis. Class III is the post-production phase. Instructor approval is required to take this class.

  • ENTM 491 - Senior Project II: Production *

    The senior project is a series of courses (up to three) in which students will work either individually or as part of a team and create or contribute to a significant media project that spotlights their area of emphasis. Class II is the production phase. Instructor approval is required to take this class

* Choose one of three courses

production emphasis

  • ENTM 103 - Fundamentals of Post-Production

    This class will focus on the basic fundamentals of post-production, which includes picture and sound editing, media management, media capture and the various editing techniques available to editors to communicate ideas.

    The class will cover the history of cinematic editing and the impact it has had on visual storytelling, as well as the various styles of editing that make up the language of cinema. Students will learn and use editing software to edit various projects and assignments.

  • ENTM 104 - Fundamentals of Production

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of pre-production and production, and the roles and responsibilities of all personnel and positions that are essential to its success. Students will become familiarized with the detailed preparation required for the shoot and the interdependence of the script, budget, schedule, and breakdown.

    Students will also learn how a digital video camera works, the characteristics of lenses, how to record clean sound, and how to use lighting to illuminate and shape an image.

  • ENTM 206 - Production Execution

    In this class, students will work as part of a collaborative production team that will write, produce, film and edit a short-form narrative film. Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the key personnel positions required to produce a film, and will execute those job functions by taking a project through pre-production, production and post-production.

  • ENTM 211 - Directing I

    Students learn to analyze and explore directorial approaches used in film and television, looking particularly at the creative use of cameras, sound, composition, and communication with those in front of and behind the camera. They explore, from a directorial perspective, the expressive potential of the image within and beyond the film.

    They learn methodologies, which stimulate visual creativity and positioning the image as the fundamental element of cinematic expression. They engage in exercises in the analysis of script and for the purpose of directing actors to obtain the best possible performance.

electives

Choose at least five

  • ENTM 105 - Writing and Pitching a Script

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, with specific application to writing for the screen. The student will learn the basics of scriptwriting and will combine this with previously acquired writing and storytelling skills to write a spec script for an existing half- hour or hour-long television series. Students will hone their presentation skills to pitch their television story. Class time will be dedicated to covering beginning and intermediate topics including breaking stories, scene writing, dialogue, subtext, direction, giving and receiving notes in a writers’ group, and script format. Students will critique one another’s work in small groups, with instructor guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required texts as well as assigned episodic television scripts.

  • ENTM 200 - Fundamentals of Story Development

    Students will develop an original feature-length screen story from multiple ideas through idea evaluation and selection, character creation and development, story structure, treatment, pitch and beat sheet. At the end of the course, students will register their work with the WGA (a $20 fee). Students will consider more advanced screenwriting concepts presented in the text and will apply those principles to their developing stories.

  • ENTM 208 - Writing Short Form Cinema

    Students will continue their study of screenwriting with a focus on writing narrative films under 40 minutes in length. They will screen and analyze multiple examples of short cinema to gain an understanding of the qualities possessed by the best examples of the form. They will write numerous short scripts with the goal of generating one or more short scripts of high quality that can be produced either inside or outside the university setting. Students will critique one another's work with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write. Students will read and respond to the required texts.

  • ENTM 303 - Directing II

    In this production intensive class which builds on the directing fundamentals learned in Directing I, students will work together weekly to create short film subjects, dealing with spiritual and Christian subject matter, in an attempt to connect noble themes to photographed light. Students will be assigned weekly subjects and be expected to present them in class for feedback and analysis.

  • ENTM 306 - Sound in Film: Production

    This course will cover the fundamentals of sound and how they are applied in a media environment to communicate a message. You will address the importance of sound in the pre-production process and how to properly prepare a project with sound in mind.

    In the production environment, students will learn the proper tools and techniques to record clean, consistent and intelligible recordings.

  • ENTM 309 - Cinematography

    This class expands on many of the skills learned in the Fundamentals of Production class. Students will learn intermediate camera and lighting techniques and how to use these specific tools to communicate a story visually.

    Specific emphasis will be on image composition, lens characteristics, codecs and formats, camera settings, specific lighting styles and instruments, and how the camera and lights complement and support the storytelling experience.

  • ENTM 311 - Adaptation

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, and Fundamentals of Story Development, with a focus on the principles and skills of adapting for the screen a story which originates in another medium, as well as adapting true stories for the screen. The student will consider the challenges inherent in adapting a story from another medium, and from true life, and will gain skills and experience by writing, developing, and/or pitching multiple stories of this type.

    Students will pitch their adaptations and will critique one another’s work in large and small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write and develop stories outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required text.

  • ENTM 318 - Lighting

    This course concentrates on the understanding of how light works, how to manipulate it, and how to use it and its supporting instruments in a way that will communicate emotion and help establish the visual character of a film.

    Students work with various types and styles of lighting instruments, stands, grip equipment and light modifiers as they light a variety of scenes.

  • ENTM 400 - Design for the Screen: Adobe after Effects

    This course is an introduction to the creative process needed when designing and producing animation for the screen. Students will complete several projects designed to introduce them to the process necessary to take an idea from the conceptual phase, further develop and refine it, and then transform it into a tangible, animated element. Students will also further develop their understanding and use of Adobe After Effects, which is the primary tool of execution for this class.

  • ENTM 415 - Advanced Cinematography

    Focusing primarily on the role of the cinematographer, you will learn how to visually communicate an idea through extensive use of the camera and lights.

    Areas of emphasis will include composition, camera techniques, camera placement and movement, lens characteristics, color, depth of field, lighting techniques, the qualities of light and color temperature.

screenwriting emphasis

  • ENTM 104 - Fundamentals of Production

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of pre-production and production, and the roles and responsibilities of all personnel and positions that are essential to its success. Students will become familiarized with the detailed preparation required for the shoot and the interdependence of the script, budget, schedule, and breakdown.

    Students will also learn how a digital video camera works, the characteristics of lenses, how to record clean sound, and how to use lighting to illuminate and shape an image.

  • ENTM 105 - Writing and Pitching a Script

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, with specific application to writing for the screen. The student will learn the basics of scriptwriting and will combine this with previously acquired writing and storytelling skills to write a spec script for an existing half- hour or hour-long television series. Students will hone their presentation skills to pitch their television story. Class time will be dedicated to covering beginning and intermediate topics including breaking stories, scene writing, dialogue, subtext, direction, giving and receiving notes in a writers’ group, and script format. Students will critique one another’s work in small groups, with instructor guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required texts as well as assigned episodic television scripts.

  • ENTM 200 - Fundamentals of Story Development

    This course builds on student understanding of screen storytelling. Students will develop an original feature-length screen story from multiple ideas through idea evaluation and selection, character creation and development, story structure, treatment, pitch and beat sheet. At the end of the course, students will register their work with the WGA (a $20 fee). Students will consider more advanced screenwriting concepts presented in the text and will apply those principles to their developing stories.

  • ENTM 201 - Writing for Screen I

    Students will at a minimum write the first two acts of a screenplay. They will read classic and modern screenplays.

    Class time will be dedicated to covering intermediate topics including scene transitions, writing with subtext, visual writing, and further developing skills in scene and dialogue writing and script formatting, and finding solutions to writer's block.

    Students will critique one another's work in small groups, with instructor supervision. Considerable time will be required for students to write.

  • ENTM 202 - Writing for Screen II

    Students will complete the first draft of a feature length screenplay and plan and complete a second draft of that screenplay, and they will register their finished work with the WGA.

    Class time will be dedicated to covering intermediate and advanced topics including rewriting, working with producers, directors and agents, types of professional meetings and how to make the most of them, how to seek buyers for scripted material, and the articulation of a well-developed personal code of ethics in entertainment. Students will critique one another's work in small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance.

    Considerable time will be required for students to write. Students will read and respond to the required texts as well as to feature screenplays and episodic television scripts.

  • ENTM 208 - Writing Short Form Cinema

    Students will continue their study of screenwriting with a focus on writing narrative films under 40 minutes in length. They will screen and analyze multiple examples of short cinema to gain an understanding of the qualities possessed by the best examples of the form. They will write numerous short scripts with the goal of generating one or more short scripts of high quality that can be produced either inside or outside the university setting. Students will critique one another's work with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write. Students will read and respond to the required texts.

electives

Choose at least three

  • ENTM 206 - Production Execution

    In this class, students will work as part of a collaborative production team that will write, produce, film and edit a short-form narrative film. Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the key personnel positions required to produce a film, and will execute those job functions by taking a project through pre-production, production and post-production.

  • ENTM 211 - Directing I

    Students learn to analyze and explore directorial approaches used in film and television, looking particularly at the creative use of cameras, sound, composition, and communication with those in front of and behind the camera. They explore, from a directorial perspective, the expressive potential of the image within and beyond the film.

    They learn methodologies, which stimulate visual creativity and positioning the image as the fundamental element of cinematic expression. They engage in exercises in the analysis of script and for the purpose of directing actors to obtain the best possible performance.

  • ENTM 260 - Writing for TV Multi-Camera Production

    The course examines the unique structure of multi-camera television production from a writing perspective, and instructs the students on how to effectively write for productions such as talk shows, sitcoms, variety shows, newscasts and news magazines.

  • ENTM 311 - Adaptation

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, and Fundamentals of Story Development, with a focus on the principles and skills of adapting for the screen a story which originates in another medium, as well as adapting true stories for the screen. The student will consider the challenges inherent in adapting a story from another medium, and from true life, and will gain skills and experience by writing, developing, and/or pitching multiple stories of this type.

    Students will pitch their adaptations and will critique one another’s work in large and small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write and develop stories outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required text.

  • ENTM 312 - Advanced Writing Seminar I

    This course provides advanced writing experience for students who have completed multiple scripts for the screen. Assignments will be individualized based on student experience, interest, and skill, and may include development and writing of feature film scripts, television episodes or pilots, short film scripts, and scripts for web-based distribution.

    Students may also rewrite existing works for which they've written earlier drafts. Students will read and lead discussions of numerous screenplays. Students will pitch their stories, and may be asked to pitch to students in other courses. Students will critique one another’s work in large and small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. They will also develop a personalized career strategy as a writer for the screen.

    The knowledge, skills, and experience gained in this course will serve aspiring writers, writer-directors, and writer-producers for film, television, and new media. Considerable time will be required for students to write and develop scripts outside of class.

  • ENTM 403 - Advanced Writing Seminar II

    This course follows Advanced Writing Seminar I and provides additional advanced writing experience for students who have completed multiple scripts for the screen. Assignments will be individualized based on student experience, interest, and skill, and may include development and writing of feature film scripts, television episodes or pilots, short film scripts, and scripts for web-based distribution. Students may also rewrite existing works for which they've written earlier drafts. Students will read and lead discussions of numerous screenplays. Students will pitch their stories, and may be asked to pitch to students in other courses. Students will critique one another’s work in large and small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. They may also be asked to supervise the script development work of underclassmen. The knowledge, skills, and experience gained in this course will serve aspiring writers, writer-directors, and writer- producers for film, television, and new media. Considerable time will be required for students to write and develop scripts outside of class.

producing emphasis

  • ENTM 103 - Fundamentals of Post-Production

    This class will focus on the basic fundamentals of post-production, which includes picture and sound editing, media management, media capture and the various editing techniques available to editors to communicate ideas.

    The class will cover the history of cinematic editing and the impact it has had on visual storytelling, as well as the various styles of editing that make up the language of cinema. Students will learn and use editing software to edit various projects and assignments.

  • ENTM 104 - Fundamentals of Production

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of pre-production and production, and the roles and responsibilities of all personnel and positions that are essential to its success. Students will become familiarized with the detailed preparation required for the shoot and the interdependence of the script, budget, schedule, and breakdown.

    Students will also learn how a digital video camera works, the characteristics of lenses, how to record clean sound, and how to use lighting to illuminate and shape an image.

  • ENTM 105 - Writing and Pitching a Script

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, with specific application to writing for the screen. The student will learn the basics of scriptwriting and will combine this with previously acquired writing and storytelling skills to write a spec script for an existing half- hour or hour-long television series. Students will hone their presentation skills to pitch their television story. Class time will be dedicated to covering beginning and intermediate topics including breaking stories, scene writing, dialogue, subtext, direction, giving and receiving notes in a writers’ group, and script format. Students will critique one another’s work in small groups, with instructor guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required texts as well as assigned episodic television scripts.

  • ENTM 203 - The Producer: Planning for Production

    The Producer: Planning for Production provides a theoretical and practical introduction to the role of the film producer in five principle areas:

    • Creative development
    • Packaging
    • Financing
    • Budgeting, scheduling and hiring
    • Marketing and distribution
  • ENTM 211 - Directing I

    Students learn to analyze and explore directorial approaches used in film and television, looking particularly at the creative use of cameras, sound, composition, and communication with those in front of and behind the camera. They explore, from a directorial perspective, the expressive potential of the image within and beyond the film.

    They learn methodologies, which stimulate visual creativity and positioning the image as the fundamental element of cinematic expression. They engage in exercises in the analysis of script and for the purpose of directing actors to obtain the best possible performance.

  • ENTM 315 - Advanced Producing

    Advanced Producing will provide students with an in depth study of the specific tasks and responsibilities of film producers. Students will be responsible for pre-production of a script, including green light analysis and creating a preliminary budget and schedule for a feature film script. Students will gain a better understanding of various types of specialized producing positions.

electives

Choose at least five

  • ENTM 200 - Fundamentals of Story Development

    This course builds on student understanding of screen storytelling. Students will develop an original feature-length screen story from multiple ideas through idea evaluation and selection, character creation and development, story structure, treatment, pitch and beat sheet. At the end of the course, students will register their work with the WGA (a $20 fee). Students will consider more advanced screenwriting concepts presented in the text and will apply those principles to their developing stories.

  • ENTM 206 - Production Execution

    In this class, students will work as part of a collaborative production team that will write, produce, film and edit a short-form narrative film. Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the key personnel positions required to produce a film, and will execute those job functions by taking a project through pre-production, production and post-production.

  • ENTM 208 - Writing Short Form Cinema

    Students will continue their study of screenwriting with a focus on writing narrative films under 40 minutes in length. They will screen and analyze multiple examples of short cinema to gain an understanding of the qualities possessed by the best examples of the form. They will write numerous short scripts with the goal of generating one or more short scripts of high quality that can be produced either inside or outside the university setting. Students will critique one another's work with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write. Students will read and respond to the required texts.

  • ENTM 303 - Directing II

    The course examines the unique structure of multi-camera television production from a writing perspective, and instructs the students on how to effectively write for productions such as talk shows, sitcoms, variety shows, newscasts and news magazines.

  • ENTM 305 - Film Finance

    This course explores the principles of Film Finance including using private equity, tax incentives, distribution, crowd funding and other traditional and emerging methods of funding media projects.

  • ENTM 311 - Adaptation

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, and Fundamentals of Story Development, with a focus on the principles and skills of adapting for the screen a story which originates in another medium, as well as adapting true stories for the screen. The student will consider the challenges inherent in adapting a story from another medium, and from true life, and will gain skills and experience by writing, developing, and/or pitching multiple stories of this type.

    Students will pitch their adaptations and will critique one another’s work in large and small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write and develop stories outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required text.

  • ENTM 400 - Design for the Screen: Adobe After Effects

    This course is an introduction to the creative process needed when designing and producing animation for the screen. Students will complete several projects designed to introduce them to the process necessary to take an idea from the conceptual phase, further develop and refine it, and then transform it into a tangible, animated element. Students will also further develop their understanding and use of Adobe After Effects, which is the primary tool of execution for this class.

  • ENTM 420 - Advanced Distribution and Marketing Strategies

    This is a forward-looking, upper-level course that prepares students with a knowledge of historic and existing strategies for the marketing and distribution of media products in particular as a way to understand the marketing and distribution of all products more generally. The course prepares students to appreciate the rapidly developing opportunities presented by new media, and to devise new marketing and distribution strategies which take advantage of those opportunities.

  • ENTM 490 - Senior Project I: Pre-Production

    The senior project is a series of courses (up to three) in which students will work either individually or as part of a team and create or contribute to a significant media project that spotlights their area of emphasis. Class I is the pre-production phase. Instructor approval is required to take this class.

  • ENTM 491 - Senior Project II: Production

    The senior project is a series of courses (up to three) in which students will work either individually or as part of a team and create or contribute to a significant media project that spotlights their area of emphasis. Class I is the pre-production phase. Instructor approval is required to take this class.

  • ENTM 492 - Senior Project III: Post-Production

    The senior project is a series of courses (up to three) in which students will work either individually or as part of a team and create or contribute to a significant media project that spotlights their area of emphasis. Class I is the pre-production phase. Instructor approval is required to take this class.

post-production emphasis

  • ENTM 103 - Fundamentals of Post-Production

    This class will focus on the basic fundamentals of post-production, which includes picture and sound editing, media management, media capture and the various editing techniques available to editors to communicate ideas.

    The class will cover the history of cinematic editing and the impact it has had on visual storytelling, as well as the various styles of editing that make up the language of cinema. Students will learn and use editing software to edit various projects and assignments.

  • ENTM 104 - Fundamentals of Production

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of pre-production and production, and the roles and responsibilities of all personnel and positions that are essential to its success. Students will become familiarized with the detailed preparation required for the shoot and the interdependence of the script, budget, schedule, and breakdown.

    Students will also learn how a digital video camera works, the characteristics of lenses, how to record clean sound, and how to use lighting to illuminate and shape an image.

  • ENTM 206 - Production Execution

    In this class, students will work as part of a collaborative production team that will write, produce, film and edit a short-form narrative film. Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the key personnel positions required to produce a film, and will execute those job functions by taking a project through pre-production, production and post-production.

  • ENTM 211 - Directing I

    Students learn to analyze and explore directorial approaches used in film and television, looking particularly at the creative use of cameras, sound, composition, and communication with those in front of and behind the camera. They explore, from a directorial perspective, the expressive potential of the image within and beyond the film.

    They learn methodologies, which stimulate visual creativity and positioning the image as the fundamental element of cinematic expression. They engage in exercises in the analysis of script and for the purpose of directing actors to obtain the best possible performance.

electives

Choose at least five

  • ENTM 105 - Writing and Pitching a Script

    This course builds on the storytelling fundamentals learned in Story, Genre and Structure, with specific application to writing for the screen. The student will learn the basics of scriptwriting and will combine this with previously acquired writing and storytelling skills to write a spec script for an existing half- hour or hour-long television series. Students will hone their presentation skills to pitch their television story. Class time will be dedicated to covering beginning and intermediate topics including breaking stories, scene writing, dialogue, subtext, direction, giving and receiving notes in a writers’ group, and script format. Students will critique one another’s work in small groups, with instructor guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write outside of class. Students will read and respond to the required texts as well as assigned episodic television scripts.

  • ENTM 208 - Writing Short Form Cinema

    Students will continue their study of screenwriting with a focus on writing narrative films under 40 minutes in length. They will screen and analyze multiple examples of short cinema to gain an understanding of the qualities possessed by the best examples of the form. They will write numerous short scripts with the goal of generating one or more short scripts of high quality that can be produced either inside or outside the university setting. Students will critique one another's work with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write. Students will read and respond to the required texts.

  • ENTM 303 - Directing II

    The course examines the unique structure of multi-camera television production from a writing perspective, and instructs the students on how to effectively write for productions such as talk shows, sitcoms, variety shows, newscasts and news magazines.

  • ENTM 308 - Sound in Film: Post-Production

    This course builds upon the skills and techniques learned in Production Sound, with an emphasis on post-production. The class will review the fundamentals of sound and how they are applied in a media environment to help communicate a message. Students will learn the element of a film or video soundtrack and how to take the elements from production and combine with created sounds and effects to create a complete sound track. Students will mix, process and enhance the soundtrack in post-production using a digital audio workstation.

  • ENTM 310 - Advanced Editing Techniques

    Students will analyze different editing styles and techniques for impact and effectiveness. They will apply these different approaches in various exercises relating to pacing, rhythm, emotion, montage and style, as well as the interplay of picture and sound. The application of proper media management and workflow will also be incorporated.

  • ENTM 400 - Design for the Screen: Adobe After Effects

    This course is an introduction to the creative process needed when designing and producing animation for the screen. Students will complete several projects designed to introduce them to the process necessary to take an idea from the conceptual phase, further develop and refine it, and then transform it into a tangible, animated element. Students will also further develop their understanding and use of Adobe After Effects, which is the primary tool of execution for this class.

  • ENTM 417 - Compositing

    This class will expand the on the students application of the art of compositing and color grading. The class will evaluate the limits of compositing within an editing software application, and then segue into the more advanced platform of Adobe After Effects.

    The second half of the class will focus on color grading and how to take a project from an edited sequence into a color grading program and manipulate its appearance to achieve a desired effect.

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