Summer Quarter 2022

« To Academic Calendar

June 20thAugust 26th

In conjunction with this quarterly class schedule, students should make use of their Academic Map and the University Catalog. The schedule posted online will be updated regularly to include textbooks, reading assignments prior to the first class, and any changes to the schedule. Please check the website regularly.
Last Updated: 7/19

Important Dates

June 27th: Add/drop deadline | August 5th: Withdrawal deadline

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Announcements
Monday
ENTM234 Screen Acting
Monday 8:00–10:50 AM
Kathryn Smith-McGlynn
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Aitken, Maria, and Michael Caine Acting in Film Revised Expanded Edition Leonard Corporation, Hal, 2000 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1476842752
  2. Barr, Tony Acting for the Camera Revised Edition HarperPerennial, 1997 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-0060928193
Show Description

This introduction to screen acting begins by analyzing the similarities and differences between stage and screen acting. Course work continues into exercises that instruct students on basic screen techniques and will evolve into introductory scene work in front of the camera. 

ActingMedia Elective
THEO337 NET Ministry Workshop
Monday 8:00–10:50 AM
Stephen Kramp
155 L
Required Books TBA

Enrollment contingent upon acceptence into Ireland trip.

Show Description

Students taking this course will prepare intensively for missionary work abroad.  Along with describing processes, aims, and challenges of evangelization, emphasis will be placed on evangelizing via shared cultural interests and personal relationship. 

Humanities Elective
BUSI105 Statistics
Monday 9:30–10:55 AM
Derry Connolly
Hybrid
155 A/B
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Carlberg, Conrad Statistical Analysis Que Publishing, Dec 14, 2017 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0789759054
Show Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental theories and principles of statistics and how those concepts relate to the real world. In particular, students will learn how to apply statistics to a business setting and gain understanding of how data can bring clarity to decision making.

Business Core
BUSI102 (Recomended)
ARTS491G Graphic Design Capstone II
Monday 12:30–3:20 PM
Fernando Del Rosario
155 N
Required Books TBA
ARTS490
ENTM325 Feature Film: Story Development
Monday 12:30–3:20 PM
George Simon
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course is part of the Feature Film Program. Students apply the knowledge and experience gained in Fundamentals of Story Development to craft entertaining and unique story concepts that are producible on an independent scale. The best projects will be selected as candidates for  production within the Feature Film Program.

Media Elective
ENTM337 Business of Acting
Monday 12:30–3:20 PM
Kathryn Smith-McGlynn
155 L
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Jackson, Kym The Hollywood Survival Guide for Actors Perfict Books, 2013 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-0987231628

Business of Acting is the actor's version of Media Career Strategies.

Show Description

This course provides students with information on how to obtain work and succeed as a television, film, voice over, or stage actor. This course prepares students for the actor's journey, with emphasis on career tools (resumés, headshots, reels, self-tapes), strategies, audition techniques, industry terminology, and extensive information about casting, representation, and union membership.

Acting
Acting Senior
HUMA432 Cultural Foundations IV
Monday 12:30–1:55 PM
Stephen Kramp
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Conrad, Joseph Heart of Darkness and Other Tales Oxford University Press, 2008 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0199536016
  2. Eliot, T. S The Waste Land, Prufrock, and Other Poems Dover Publications, 1998 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0486400617
  3. Greene, Graham The End of the Affair Penguin Books, 2004 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0142437988
  4. Lewis, C. S The Abolition of Man, Or, Reflections on Education With Special Reference to the Teaching of English in the Upper Forms of Schools HarperSanFrancisco, 2001 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0060652944

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

Show Description

The 20th century confronted Western civilization with a huge array of cultural movements, political crises, and technological breakthroughs. This course provides students with the historical grounding necessary for a serious reconnaissance into the recent past via its major cultural products. Some of these works have emerged over time as radiant masterworks, and others have proved to be but nightmarish visions. All, however, merit study and critical treatment, as they mark our previous century in all its alarm, acceleration and terrible beauty.

Humanities Core
PHIL203-1 Philosophy of Nature
Monday 12:30–3:20 PM
Fr. Andy Younan
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Younan, Andy Philosophy of Nature CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, Feb 09, 2015Buy Now978-1508430070read pp. 1-40
Show Description

This course is a detailed study in the various understandings of nature, beginning from the mythology of the Enuma Elish as a primitive attempt at grasping the world, to the classical understanding found in Aristotle’s Physics and Parts of Animals and their Medieval development in Thomas Aquinas’s The Principles of Nature, to foundational texts in modern natural sciences such as those of Descartes, Galileo and Newton, to discussions of evolution found in Darwin, and finally to near-contemporary physicists such as Heisenberg. The contrast between the classical stress on substantial form and formal causality and the modern method of material causality and mathematical law will be brought to the forefront, as will the emphasis on technology as a mastery of nature in modern science and the question of teleology, whether nature acts for a purpose.

University Core
Recomended: PHIL101
PHIL204Philosophy of Man PHIL408Philosophy of God  
ARTS201 Color Theory
Monday 3:30–6:20 PM
Fernando Del Rosario
155 N
Required Books TBA
Show Description

A thorough breakdown of the process of creating from initial concepts to final design taught by professionals in the design industry.

Graphic DesignIllustrationMedia ElectiveHumanities Elective
ARTS490D Illustration Capstone I
Monday 3:30–6:20 PM
Jacqueline Gold
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Illustration Senior
PHIL203-2 Philosophy of Nature
Monday 3:30–6:20 PM
Fr. Andy Younan
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Younan, Andy Philosophy of Nature CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, Feb 09, 2015Buy Now978-1508430070read pp. 1-40
Show Description

This course is a detailed study in the various understandings of nature, beginning from the mythology of the Enuma Elish as a primitive attempt at grasping the world, to the classical understanding found in Aristotle’s Physics and Parts of Animals and their Medieval development in Thomas Aquinas’s The Principles of Nature, to foundational texts in modern natural sciences such as those of Descartes, Galileo and Newton, to discussions of evolution found in Darwin, and finally to near-contemporary physicists such as Heisenberg. The contrast between the classical stress on substantial form and formal causality and the modern method of material causality and mathematical law will be brought to the forefront, as will the emphasis on technology as a mastery of nature in modern science and the question of teleology, whether nature acts for a purpose.

University Core
Recomended: PHIL101
PHIL204Philosophy of Man PHIL408Philosophy of God  
ENTM345 Voice Acting
Monday 6:30–9:30 PM
Paul Rugg
155 L
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course will teach the craft and business of voice acting. Students will learn the fundamentals of voice acting including basic vocal acting techniques, using and caring for the voice, developing vocal styles, and effective use of microphone and recording techniques. The course also explores recording environments, voice acting and voice over genres, and steps to consider in pursuing a career in voice acting.

Media Elective
ENTM427-1 Feature Film: Post-Production
Monday 6:30–9:20 PM
Melinda Simon
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Each student will need to bring a hard drive formatted to a Mac.

This class is 6 units (equivalent to 2 classes).

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID and section number.

Show Description

This course is part of the Feature Film Program. Students fulfill the role of editor to create a rough cut, fine cut, and achieve picture lock on a feature length narrative film project under the guidance of a professional editor and in collaboration with the film's director. Each student is responsible for editing a specific portion of the movie and must collaborate to craft a cohesive style that fulfills the director's vision.

Media Elective
ENTM437 Musical Production
Monday 6:30–9:20 PM
Rebecca Zimmer-Huber
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $50 Class Fee.

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Musical Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Acting Productions meet multiple times a week.

Show Description

From first reading through to performance, students rehearse and perform a musical from a classic or contemporary writer. Students must audition to register for this class. This course may be taken multiple times for credit.

6 units
Must Audition
Tuesday
BUSM321 Building Brands
Tuesday 8:00–10:50 AM
Joe Connolly
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Heyward, Emily Obsessed Penguin Publishing Group, 2020 Buy Now978-0593084311
  2. Miller, Donald Building a Story Brand HarperCollins Leadership, 2018 Buy Now978-0718033323Go to mystorybrand.com and setup an account. We will be using this tool to build your brandThriftbooks has a number available
Show Description

Students will learn how to effectively communicate visually through a brand to create several compelling and cohesive identities.

Business Elective
ENTM308 Sound in Film: Post-Production
Tuesday 8:00–10:50 AM
Mark Henry
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $50 Course Fee
  2. SoundGym Sound Gym View LinkPlease sign up for Ear Training. It is free, and your ears are essential in post-production.
Show Description

This course builds upon the skills and techniques learned in Sound in Film: Production, with an emphasis on post-production. The class will review the fundamentals of sound and how they are applied in a media environment to help communicate a message. Students will learn the element of a film or video soundtrack and how to take the elements from production and combine with created sounds and effects to create a complete soundtrack. Students will mix, process and enhance the soundtrack in post-production using a digital audio workstation.

Post-ProductionMedia Elective
ENTM103Fundamentals of Post-ProductionENTM104Fundamentals of Production
HUMA124-1 Advanced College Writing
Tuesday 8:00–9:25 AM
Elisabeth Kramp
155 A/B

In spring, students choose between two core classes: Business Communications or Advanced College Writing. In summer, students will take whatever course not yet completed.

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID and section number.

Show Description

Students conduct research on a primary text and write a lengthy paper, practicing revision and editing skills as they develop their original theses.  This class encourages a “close reading” of a primary text, requires students to build an annotated bibliography to evaluate secondary and tertiary source material, and introduces rhetorical concepts in the effort to help students become stronger readers and writers.

University Core
HUMA124-2 Advanced College Writing
Tuesday 9:30–10:55 AM
Elisabeth Kramp
155 A/B

In spring, students choose between two core classes: Business Communications or Advanced College Writing. In summer, students will take whatever course not yet completed.

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID and section number.

Show Description

Students conduct research on a primary text and write a lengthy paper, practicing revision and editing skills as they develop their original theses.  This class encourages a “close reading” of a primary text, requires students to build an annotated bibliography to evaluate secondary and tertiary source material, and introduces rhetorical concepts in the effort to help students become stronger readers and writers.

University Core
BUSI341 Special Topics in Business
Tuesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Joe Szalkiewicz
155 M
Required Books TBA
Show Description

Current topics of special interest in business as announced in the Schedule of Classes.

Business Elective
DIGM452 Game Jam
Tuesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Max Hulburt
155 L
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course
Show Description

In this course, students will develop a deeper understanding of the overall process of game production from conception to marketing through the creation of several game design documents and prototypes. Post-mortem will be presented after each prototype.

Media Elective
DIGM106Fundamentals of Game Design
ENTM202 Writing for the Screen II
Tuesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Christopher Riley
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Iglesias, Karl The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Screenwritrs Second edition Adams Media Buy Now978-1440527890
  2. Lamott, Anne Bird by Bird Anchor Books, 1995 Buy Now978-0385480017
Show Description

Students will continue their study of screenwriting begun in Writing for the Screen I. They will complete the first draft of a feature length screenplay and plan and complete a second draft of that screenplay, and they will register their finished work with the WGA. Class time will be dedicated to covering intermediate and advanced topics including rewriting, working with producers, directors and agents, types of professional meetings and how to make the most of them, how to seek buyers for scripted material, and the articulation of a well-developed personal code of ethics in entertainment. Students will critique one another's work in small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. Considerable time will be required for students to write. Students will read and respond to the required texts as well as to feature screenplays and episodic television scripts.

ScreenwritingMedia Elective
ENTM101Story, Genre and StructureENTM105Writing and Pitching a ScriptENTM200Fundamentals of Story DevelopmentENTM201Writing for the Screen I
ENTM312Advanced Writing Seminar IENTM403Advanced Writing Seminar II
ENTM303 Directing II
Tuesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Nathan Scoggins
155 N
Required Books TBA
Show Description

In this production intensive class which builds on the directing fundamentals learned in Directing I, students will work together weekly to create short film subjects, dealing with spiritual and Christian subject matter, in an attempt to connect noble themes to photographed light. Students will be assigned weekly subjects and be expected to present them in class for feedback and analysis.

Post-ProductionProducingProductionMedia Elective
ENTM211Directing I
ENTM306 Sound in Film: Production
Tuesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Mark Henry
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $40 Course Fee
  2. Mierzwa, Patrushkha Behind the Sound Cart, A Veteran's Guide to Sound on the Set Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-1736290002Read the Forward of the book through Chapter 3 before Session 1. Be prepaired for class discussion
Show Description

This course will cover the fundamentals of sound and how they are applied in a media environment to help communicate a message. The class will address the importance of sound in the pre-production process and how to properly prepare a project with a sound state of mind. In the production environment, students will learn the proper sound tools and techniques and how to use them to record clean, consistent and intelligible recordings.

ProductionMedia Elective
ENTM104Fundamentals of Production
DIGM350 Organic Modeling I
Tuesday 3:30–4:55 PM
Max Hulburt
Hybrid
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course
Show Description

In this class, students will explore various techniques for modeling and sculpting organic assets using Maya and ZBrush. Students will produce low and high-poly animals and humans for animation and games. In addition, complementary techniques such as box modeling, edge loop modeling, UV layout, and texturing will be explored.

AnimationGame DevelopmentMedia Elective
ARTS221Life Drawing IDIGM313Hard Surface Modeling I
ENTM200 Fundamentals of Story Development
Tuesday 3:30–6:20 PM
Christopher Riley
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Snyder, Blake Save the Cat! M. Wiese Productions, 2005 Buy Now978-1932907001
Show Description

This course builds on student understanding of screen storytelling established in Story, Genre and Structure and Writing and Pitching a Script. Students will develop an original feature-length screen story from multiple ideas through idea evaluation and selection, character creation and development, story structure, treatment, pitch and beat sheet. At the end of the course, students will register their work with the WGA (a $20 fee). Students will consider more advanced screenwriting concepts presented in the text and will apply those principles to their developing stories.

ScreenwritingMedia Elective
ENTM101Story, Genre and StructureENTM105 or DIGM122
ENTM201Writing for the Screen IENTM202Writing for the Screen IIENTM312Advanced Writing Seminar IENTM403Advanced Writing Seminar II
ENTM304 Commercials & Persuasive Programming
Tuesday 3:30–6:20 PM
Nathan Scoggins
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course focuses on how persuasion is effectively used in the world of media to influence viewers. Focusing primarily on its use in the world of advertising, students will identify the commercial advertising requirements of potential clients, and effectively produce television commercials to achieve identified goals. Students will also evaluate client needs, identify a target audience, craft a message promoting unique benefits and importance to customers, pitch a concept, and present the finished product to a simulated client for approval and feedback.

Media Elective
ENTM104Fundamentals of Production
ENTM330 Acting III: Character Building and Development
Tuesday 3:30–5:20 PM
Lee Eskey & Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Stanislavski, Konstantin An Actor's Work: A Student's Diary Buy NowPhysical Copies Only

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

This class will meet differently depending on the week. During the weeks of June 20, July 4, July 18, this class will meet for the full time for all meetings listed on the schedule. During the other weeks this class will meet Wednesday 8:00–10:50am.

Show Description

This course is an exploration of building and performing characters that fall outside the student’s physical/ vocal type. The emphasis will be on creating characters based on the recognition of the student’s internal emotional life, demonstrating characters based on the establishment of external vocal/physical adjustments, and interpreting characters based on script analysis.

ActingMusical Theatre
ENTM131Introduction to Performing TechniquesENTM220Pre/Corequisite: ENTM335
HUMA320 Writing Short Fiction II
Tuesday 3:30–6:20 PM
Stephen Kramp
155 L
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction W. W. Norton & Company, 2006 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0393926125Used copies may be purchased at a much lower price than new
Show Description

Picking up where Writing Short Fiction I leaves off, this course affords advanced students additional instruction in the demanding art of short story writing.  The workshop model continues to serve discussions of original student work, and during other class discussions particular stress is laid on finer aspects of craft and sincere engagement with more recent masters of the form. 

Creative Writing
HUMA220Writing Short Fiction I
ENTM230 Acting II: Action and Text
Tuesday 5:30–9:20 PM
Lee Eskey & Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Caldarone, Marina, and Maggie Lloyd-Williams Actions Drama Publishers, August 30, 2004 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0896762527Students should bring to class this book, which they should already have from Acting I
  2. Lindsay-Abaire, David Rabbit Hole Dramatists Play Service Inc., 2006 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0822221548Any copy (used, new, etc) is okay
  3. Miller, Arthur A View From the Bridge Viking Press, 1960 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0670000739Read the play prior to the first class sessionAny copy (used, new, etc) is welcome

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

This class will meet differently depending on the week. During the weeks of June 20, July 4, July 18, this class will meet for the full time for all meetings listed on the schedule. During the other weeks this class will meet Wednesday 12:30–3:20pm.

Show Description

In this course text and dialogue are considered from the actor’s perspective. Scene work is explored, and students are instructed in text analysis (the study of the language within the script) and scene study (the study of the structure of the script) for performance.

ActingMusical Theatre
ENTM132Acting I: Foundations
DIGM321 Environment Design II
Tuesday 6:30–9:20 PM
Nate Sartain
Online
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This class will provide students with the opportunity to develop fully interactive game environment inside a game engine. Students will use basic first-person game controller to navigate inside an interactive game environment in order to validate their designs.

AnimationGame DevelopmentMedia Elective
DIGM320Environment Design I
DIGM322 3D Animation I
Tuesday 6:30–9:20 PM
George Castro
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course
Show Description

This class is designed to provide students with the opportunity to study principles of traditional animation and incorporate those principles into computer animation. Students will produce several cyclical and performance-based animations.

AnimationGame DevelopmentMedia Elective
DIGM1083D Fundamentals
ENTM437 Musical Production
Tuesday 6:30–9:20 PM
Rebecca Zimmer-Huber
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $50 Class Fee.

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Musical Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Show Description

From first reading through to performance, students rehearse and perform a musical from a classic or contemporary writer. Students must audition to register for this class. This course may be taken multiple times for credit.

6 units
Must Audition
PHIL301 Epistemology
Tuesday 6:30–9:20 PM
Shalina Stilley
155 L
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Cooper, David Edward, Jitendranath Mohanty, and Ernest Sosa Epistemology Blackwell Publishers, 1999 Buy Now978-0631210870
  2. Plato Meno Hackett, 1980 Buy Now978-0915144242Read pp. 1–18
Show Description

Building upon previous philosophy courses, this class examines the causes of human knowledge. Specifically, students will be introduced to philosophical solutions to questions relating to the nature of knowledge, the object of knowledge, the role of the internal and external senses, and the concepts of truth and certainty. After thoroughly examining the sophisticated understandings of the nature of truth and certainty found in Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas, we will closely examine the skepticism of the modern period through the writings of Hume, and the systematization of the structure of the mind in Kantian idealism, concluding in the 20th Century attempt to fuse idealism and realism in Martin Heidegger.

Philosophy & TheologyNew EvangelizationHumanities Elective
PHIL203Philosophy of NaturePHIL204Philosophy of Man 
Wednesday
BUSI393 Leadership and Management
Wednesday 8:00–10:50 AM
Joe Connolly
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Blanchard, Ken, Patricia Zigarmi, and Drea Zigarmi Leadership and the One Minute Manager William Morrow, October 15, 2013Buy Now978-0062309440Very affordable on Thriftbooks
  2. Blanchard, Ken, Spencer Johnson M.D The New One Minute Manager William Morrow, May 05, 2015Buy Now978-0062367549Very affordable on Thriftbooks
Show Description

This course is an introductory-level course for students. Its intent is to give an in-depth understanding of the differences between—and similarities of—leadership and management. The course focuses on the major traits of leaders and managers, and augments these with examples of great historic leaders, including George Custer and Jesus Christ. The course also studies the many leadership traits of Abraham Lincoln and looks at how these can be applied in modern business to improve management techniques. As part of the learning process, students give summaries of Lincoln’s leadership lessons, using short, Power Point presentations.

University Core
ENTM330 Acting III: Character Building and Development
Wednesday 8:00–10:50 AM
Lee Eskey & Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Stanislavski, Konstantin An Actor's Work: A Student's Diary Buy NowPhysical Copies Only

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

This class will meet differently depending on the week. During the weeks of June 20, July 4, July 18, this class will meet for the full time for all meetings listed on the schedule. During the other weeks this class will meet Wednesday 8:00–10:50am.

Show Description

This course is an exploration of building and performing characters that fall outside the student’s physical/ vocal type. The emphasis will be on creating characters based on the recognition of the student’s internal emotional life, demonstrating characters based on the establishment of external vocal/physical adjustments, and interpreting characters based on script analysis.

ActingMusical Theatre
ENTM131Introduction to Performing TechniquesENTM220Pre/Corequisite: ENTM335
ENTM403 Advanced Writing Seminar II
Wednesday 8:00–10:50 AM
Christopher Riley
Online
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course
Show Description

This course follows Advanced Writing Seminar I and provides additional advanced writing experience for students who have completed multiple scripts for the screen. Assignments will be individualized based on student experience, interest, and skill, and may include development and writing of feature film scripts, television episodes or pilots, short film scripts, and scripts for web-based distribution. Students may also rewrite existing works for which they've written earlier drafts. Students will read and lead discussions of numerous screenplays. Students will pitch their stories, and may be asked to pitch to students in other courses. Students will critique one another’s work in large and small groups, with instructor supervision and guidance. They may also be asked to supervise the script development work of underclassmen. The knowledge, skills, and experience gained in this course will serve aspiring writers, writer-directors, and writer-producers for film, television, and new media. Considerable time will be required for students to write and develop scripts outside of class.

ScreenwritingMedia Elective
ENTM101Story, Genre and StructureENTM105Writing and Pitching a ScriptENTM200Fundamentals of Story DevelopmentENTM201Writing for the Screen IENTM202Writing for the Screen IIENTM312Advanced Writing Seminar I
ENTM498 Senior Project IV: Marketing and Film Festivals
Wednesday 8:00–10:50 AM
Nathan Scoggins
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

Just because you have finished a film doesn't mean your work is done! In this concluding class to the Senior Project experience, students will develop and implement a marketing strategy for their senior project films. They will research film festivals appropriate for their film, develop a strategy and schedule for submitting to those film festivals, develop marketing materials for their films (including posters and taglines), craft documents that will enable strong consideration (including Director's Statements and personalized letters), and budget their senior project financial resources to implement their strategy.

Media Elective
ENTM490Senior Project: Pre-ProductionENTM491Senior Project: ProductionENTM492Senior Project: Post-Production
MUSC202 Sacred Music
Wednesday 8:00–10:50 AM
John Polhamus
155 M
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course will familiarize students with the history, styles, function and practical application of the sacred music of the Roman Catholic church. This information will include sources of information, parochial interface, and applied performance (standard of performance is not measured, only familiarity of principles).

Media ElectiveHumanities Elective
ARTS122-1 Observational Drawing
Wednesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Jacqueline Gold
155 D
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Download Supplies List
Show Description

This class is designed to help students develop drawing skills by translating what students observe about three-dimensional objects into lines and shapes on a two dimensional medium, while incorporating surface textures and varying line qualities into object and environment design concepts.

AnimationGame DevelopmentGraphic DesignIllustrationMedia ElectiveHumanities Elective
ARTS121Drawing in Perspective
DIGM217 Motion Graphics II
Wednesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Nate Sjogren
155 N
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course is a deep-dive into Adobe After effects. Students will learn various advanced animation techniques used in the motion graphics industry, including character rigging and animation. Students will ultimately learn foundational techniques that will give them the technical ability to work on any professional motion graphics project.

Media Elective
ENTM212Intro to After EffectsDIGM215Photoshop & IllustratorDIGM216Motion Graphics I
ENTM230 Acting II: Action and Text
Wednesday 12:30–4:30 PM
Lee Eskey & Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Caldarone, Marina, and Maggie Lloyd-Williams Actions Drama Publishers, August 30, 2004 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0896762527Students should bring to class this book, which they should already have from Acting I
  2. Lindsay-Abaire, David Rabbit Hole Dramatists Play Service Inc., 2006 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0822221548Any copy (used, new, etc) is okay
  3. Miller, Arthur A View From the Bridge Viking Press, 1960 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0670000739Read the play prior to the first class sessionAny copy (used, new, etc) is welcome

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

This class will meet differently depending on the week. During the weeks of June 20, July 4, July 18, this class will meet for the full time for all meetings listed on the schedule. During the other weeks this class will meet Wednesday 12:30–3:20pm.

Show Description

In this course text and dialogue are considered from the actor’s perspective. Scene work is explored, and students are instructed in text analysis (the study of the language within the script) and scene study (the study of the structure of the script) for performance.

ActingMusical Theatre
ENTM132Acting I: Foundations
ENTM346 Screen Acting Lab
Wednesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Nathan Scoggins
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

Actors collaborate with a select group of directors and cinematographers to craft compelling scenes in a narrative film environment. Scenes are performed and captured on set with active mentorship from faculty to foster fruitful collaborations between actors and directors. Students study their work in post production to develop a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities that exist within narrative filmmaking to craft a dynamic performance.

Media Elective
ENTM234 (Acting Students)Non-actors may request instructor approval.
ENTM410 Media Law and Ethics
Wednesday 12:30–3:20 PM
Shun Lee Fong
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Ashley Packard Digital Media Law 2nd Ed John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2012 Buy Now978-1118290729Read and be prepared to discuss Chapter 1 before the first class
Show Description

The course examines the legal relationships in the motion picture and television industries, as well as the legal relationships between artists and their personal managers. It covers the key legal principles that are involved in most media productions. This includes with trade unions, licensing, intellectual property and contract issues. In addition, this course explores ethical challenges students are likely to encounter working in entertainment and guides them through the development of a personal code of ethics that is informed by the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

Communications Media Core
ENTM336 Behind the Scenes
Wednesday 2:00–5:00 PM
Christopher Riley
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course

This course is only available for those accepted into the LA Quarter experience.

The meeting schedule may be modified by the instructor to accommodate guest speakers' schedules.

Show Description

This course will provide students access to a firsthand, in depth look at the entertainment industry through the experience of entertainment industry professionals. Each session may include site visits, presentations, panel discussions, and practical training with people who play a role in the creation of content for film, television, and new media.

Media ElectiveLA Quarter
Media Senior
ARTS122-2 Observational Drawing
Wednesday 3:30–6:20 PM
Jacqueline Gold
155 D
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Download Supplies List
Show Description

This class is designed to help students develop drawing skills by translating what students observe about three-dimensional objects into lines and shapes on a two dimensional medium, while incorporating surface textures and varying line qualities into object and environment design concepts.

AnimationGame DevelopmentGraphic DesignIllustrationMedia ElectiveHumanities Elective
ARTS121Drawing in Perspective
HUMA328 Genre Fiction
Wednesday 3:30–6:20 PM
Megan Eccles
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

Students taking this course will write creatively in a variety of literary genres, including fantasy, science fiction, mystery, horror, romance, western, and/or historical fiction. Assignments will aim to improve students' ability to better understand these genres and to write publishable fiction in various modes, and further to better grasp universal components and principles of fiction writing that apply regardless of whether a story's horse has a saddle, fangs, mounted lasers, or wings.

Humanities Elective
ENTM101Story, Genre and Structure
MUSC201 Music in Media
Wednesday 3:30–6:20 PM
Robert Giracello
155 E
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course will provide an analysis of music and sound as they relate to the construction of feature films, television, and video games.

Media ElectiveHumanities Elective
DIGM313 Hard Surface Modeling I
Wednesday 6:30–9:20 PM
Nate Sartain
Online
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This class is designed to help students develop 3D modeling skills to produce low and high-poly hard surface models for animation and games. Students will learn to model using proper topology and be introduced to methods of speeding up workflow while creating props, buildings, and other hard surface objects.

AnimationGame DevelopmentMedia Elective
DIGM1083D Fundamentals
ENTM437 Musical Production
Wednesday 6:30–9:20 PM
Angie Bitsko
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $50 Class Fee.

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Musical Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Acting Productions meet multiple times a week.

Show Description

From first reading through to performance, students rehearse and perform a musical from a classic or contemporary writer. Students must audition to register for this class. This course may be taken multiple times for credit.

6 units
Must Audition
PHIL302 Existentialism
Wednesday 6:30–9:20 PM
Shalina Stilley
155 L
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Marcel, Gabriel A Gabriel Marcel Reader View Link
  2. Marino, Gordon Basic Writings of Existentialism Modern Library, 2004 Buy Now978-0375759895
Show Description

This course will offer an overview of some of the main themes, questions, and figures of existentialist thought. Topics studied may include freedom, authenticity, subjectivity, individualism, purpose, angst, being, and God.  Figures studied may include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Gabriel Marcel, Jacques Maritain, and others.

Thursday
BUSI420 Business Law
Thursday 8:00–10:50 AM
Bradley Bartlett
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Cahoy, Daniel, et al Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business 19th Ed McGraw Hill View LinkThe main "Buy Now" link points to the loose leaf version. Alternatively, you can rent the hard cover version
Show Description

Students study in detail the significant legal considerations involved with forming and operating a sustainable small business, becoming acquainted with real-world examples of incorporation issues and trade-offs, taxes and tax liabilities, human resource commitments and limitations, advertising issues and implications; contract law; patent, copyright and trademark law; and digital rights management.

Business Core
ENTM330 Acting III: Character Building and Development
Thursday 8:00–10:50 AM
Lee Eskey & Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Stanislavski, Konstantin An Actor's Work: A Student's Diary Buy NowPhysical Copies Only

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

This class will meet differently depending on the week. During the weeks of June 20, July 4, July 18, this class will meet for the full time for all meetings listed on the schedule. During the other weeks this class will meet Wednesday 8:00–10:50am.

Show Description

This course is an exploration of building and performing characters that fall outside the student’s physical/ vocal type. The emphasis will be on creating characters based on the recognition of the student’s internal emotional life, demonstrating characters based on the establishment of external vocal/physical adjustments, and interpreting characters based on script analysis.

ActingMusical Theatre
ENTM131Introduction to Performing TechniquesENTM220Pre/Corequisite: ENTM335
HUMA124-1 Advanced College Writing
Thursday 8:00–9:25 AM
Elisabeth Kramp
155 A/B

In spring, students choose between two core classes: Business Communications or Advanced College Writing. In summer, students will take whatever course not yet completed.

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID and section number.

Show Description

Students conduct research on a primary text and write a lengthy paper, practicing revision and editing skills as they develop their original theses.  This class encourages a “close reading” of a primary text, requires students to build an annotated bibliography to evaluate secondary and tertiary source material, and introduces rhetorical concepts in the effort to help students become stronger readers and writers.

University Core
DIGM215 Photoshop & Illustrator
Thursday 9:30–10:55 AM
Max Hulburt
Hybrid
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course
Show Description

This course is an introduction to Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Students will learn techniques for photo enhancement, image compositing, and logo creation through several projects.

AnimationGraphic DesignMedia Elective
HUMA124-2 Advanced College Writing
Thursday 9:30–10:55 AM
Elisabeth Kramp
155 A/B

In spring, students choose between two core classes: Business Communications or Advanced College Writing. In summer, students will take whatever course not yet completed.

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID and section number.

Show Description

Students conduct research on a primary text and write a lengthy paper, practicing revision and editing skills as they develop their original theses.  This class encourages a “close reading” of a primary text, requires students to build an annotated bibliography to evaluate secondary and tertiary source material, and introduces rhetorical concepts in the effort to help students become stronger readers and writers.

University Core
BUSI193-1 Introduction to Marketing
Thursday 12:30–3:30 PM
Joe Connolly
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Godin, Seth This Is Marketing: You Can't Be Seen Until You Learn to See Penguin Publishing Group, November 2018Buy Now978-0525540830Audiobook OK, just make sure you look up the graphics referenced
Show Description

This course focuses on introducing the idea of “entrepreneurial marketing” and is aimed at students who plan to start a new venture or take a job as a marketing professional pursuing an innovative marketing approach. Students will study a full spectrum of marketing strategy and tactics that are especially suitable for entrepreneurial firms aiming for high growth and innovation yet faced by limited resources and uncertain industry dynamics. Students will work in teams on marketing plans for their own venture or for other high-profile entrepreneurs or executives. The focus of this course is on hands-on experiences and practical relevance of innovative marketing concepts.

University Core
BUSI492 Business Launchpad III
Thursday 12:30–3:20 PM
Marc Burch
IndStdy
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. No textbooks are required for this course
Show Description

The third in a sequence of three 3-unit classes offered to upperclassmen, generally seniors. In this course, the team will continue to refine their financial forecast model and develop their marketing and funding plans, as well as putting their legal structure in place. The goal is a product or service ready for market with a team in place to deliver and support it, with a complete business plan, which includes a refined financial forecast model.

Business Elective
BUSI491Business Launchpad II
DIGM492 Portfolio Review
Thursday 12:30–3:20 PM
Max Hulburt
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Kleon, Austin Show Your Work! Buy Now978-0761178972
  2. Kleon, Austin Steal Like an Artist Workman Pub., Co., 2012 Buy Now978-0761169253
Show Description

This comprehensive studio class will allow students to produce and polish their portfolio content. Several in-class progress milestones, qualitative portfolio reviews by the industry professional guest speakers, and peer critiques will enhance students' experience, and provide maximum guidance to improving the overall quality of students' artwork.

AnimationGame Development
DIGM491Production Studio II
ENTM309 Cinematography
Thursday 12:30–3:20 PM
George Simon
155 K
Required Books TBA

Cinematography is a prerequisite for Lighting & Advanced Cinematography.

Show Description

This class expands on many of the skills learned in the Fundamentals of Production class. Students will learn intermediate camera and lighting techniques and how to use these specific tools to communicate a story visually. Specific emphasis will be on image composition, lens characteristics, codecs and formats, camera settings, specific lighting styles and instruments, and how the camera and lights complement and support the storytelling experience.

ProductionMedia Elective
ENTM104Fundamentals of Production
ENTM318LightingENTM415Advanced Cinematography Techniques
HUMA432 Cultural Foundations IV
Thursday 12:30–1:55 PM
Stephen Kramp
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Conrad, Joseph Heart of Darkness and Other Tales Oxford University Press, 2008 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0199536016
  2. Eliot, T. S The Waste Land, Prufrock, and Other Poems Dover Publications, 1998 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0486400617
  3. Greene, Graham The End of the Affair Penguin Books, 2004 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0142437988
  4. Lewis, C. S The Abolition of Man, Or, Reflections on Education With Special Reference to the Teaching of English in the Upper Forms of Schools HarperSanFrancisco, 2001 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0060652944

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID.

Show Description

The 20th century confronted Western civilization with a huge array of cultural movements, political crises, and technological breakthroughs. This course provides students with the historical grounding necessary for a serious reconnaissance into the recent past via its major cultural products. Some of these works have emerged over time as radiant masterworks, and others have proved to be but nightmarish visions. All, however, merit study and critical treatment, as they mark our previous century in all its alarm, acceleration and terrible beauty.

Humanities Core
BUSI193-2 Introduction to Marketing
Thursday 3:30–6:20 PM
Joe Connolly
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Godin, Seth This Is Marketing: You Can't Be Seen Until You Learn to See Penguin Publishing Group, November 2018Buy Now978-0525540830Audiobook OK, just make sure you look up the graphics referenced
Show Description

This course focuses on introducing the idea of “entrepreneurial marketing” and is aimed at students who plan to start a new venture or take a job as a marketing professional pursuing an innovative marketing approach. Students will study a full spectrum of marketing strategy and tactics that are especially suitable for entrepreneurial firms aiming for high growth and innovation yet faced by limited resources and uncertain industry dynamics. Students will work in teams on marketing plans for their own venture or for other high-profile entrepreneurs or executives. The focus of this course is on hands-on experiences and practical relevance of innovative marketing concepts.

University Core
DIGM203 Game Design I
Thursday 3:30–6:20 PM
Rodney Figueroa
155 N
Required Books TBA
Show Description

Building on game design concepts learned in Fundamentals of Game Design, this course focuses on creating digital prototypes in order to test and evaluate gameplay mechanics, aesthetics, and control schemes. Prototyping for specific audiences such as investors, publishers, and churches will also be explored.

Gaming Emphasis
DIGM106Fundamentals of Game Design
ENTM338 Acting Production: Part 1
Thursday 3:30–4:55 PM
Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Books TBA

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Acting Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Acting Productions meet multiple times a week.

Show Description

This course will give students the opportunity to screen and discuss various content projects with media professionals who played a significant role in the creation or distribution of that content. Each session may include screenings, presentations, or panel discussions with key creative, marketing, or distribution professionals associated with the content screened.

ActingMedia Elective
Must Audition
HUMA424 Advanced Shakespeare
Thursday 3:30–6:20 PM
Stephen Kramp
155 A/B
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Shakespeare, William A Midsummer Night's Dream (New Folger Library Shakespeare) Washington Square Press, January 1, 2004 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0743477543
  2. Shakespeare, William As You Like It (Signet Classics) Signet Classics, April 1, 1998 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0451526786
  3. Shakespeare, William The Merchant of Venice (Folger Shakespeare Library) Washington Square Press, January 1, 2004 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0743477567
  4. Shakespeare, William The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Washington Square Press (Pocket Books), 1992 08 Buy NowPhysical Copies Only978-0671722852
Show Description

This course allows students to engage more deeply with less commonly explored works of Shakespeare. Comedies, tragedies, and histories receive more or less equal focus, and readings and discussions are augmented by students' stagings of some parts of the plays.

HUMA112Cultural Foundations II
MUSC221 Electronic Composition I
Thursday 3:30–6:20 PM
Robert Giracello
155 E
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This class is an exploration in modern electronic music, synthesizers, computer assisted rhythm, and production. Primarily demonstrated with third party software (ProTools and Ableton live), the student will produce electronic compositions and develop unique sonic environments. NOTE: Knowledge of musical fundamentals is helpful.

Media ElectiveHumanities Elective
ENTM427-1 Feature Film: Post-Production
Thursday 6:30–9:20 PM
Melinda Simon
155 N
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Each student will need to bring a hard drive formatted to a Mac.

This class is 6 units (equivalent to 2 classes).

This class meets twice a week. To find the correlating meeting, match up the Course ID and section number.

Show Description

This course is part of the Feature Film Program. Students fulfill the role of editor to create a rough cut, fine cut, and achieve picture lock on a feature length narrative film project under the guidance of a professional editor and in collaboration with the film's director. Each student is responsible for editing a specific portion of the movie and must collaborate to craft a cohesive style that fulfills the director's vision.

Media Elective
ENTM437 Musical Production
Thursday 6:30–9:20 PM
Angie Bitsko
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $50 Class Fee.

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Musical Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Acting Productions meet multiple times a week.

Show Description

From first reading through to performance, students rehearse and perform a musical from a classic or contemporary writer. Students must audition to register for this class. This course may be taken multiple times for credit.

6 units
Must Audition
Friday
THEO314-1 Christian Experience IV
Friday 8:00–10:50 AM
Sam Keyes
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Libreria Editrice Vaticana Catechism of the Catholic Church, English Updated Edition Our Sunday Visitor, Publishing Division, 2020 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1601376497
  2. Mattison, William C Introducing Moral Theology Brazos Press, 2008 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1587432231
  3. Sri, Edward Men, Women, and the Mystery of Love Franciscan Media, 2015 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1632530806
Show Description

While mainstream 21st century life operates in the arbitrary and meaningless condition that Pope St. John Paul II called a “culture of death,” the Catholic tradition holds out the enduring reality of human nature and its supernatural vocation to beatitude. Starting from Part Three of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, this course introduces the Catholic vision of morality centered on the virtues and the attainment of the beatific vision. In his “theology of the body,” our university’s patron insists that the Catholic view of moral action centers on the meaningfulness of the human body. As such, the course gives special attention to JPII’s teaching on the “nuptial meaning” of the body as an alternative to postmodern voluntarist individualism.

University Core
THEO111Christian Experience ITHEO112Christian Experience IITHEO113Christian Experience III
THEO328 Eastern Catholicism
Friday 8:00–10:50 AM
Fr. Ankido Sipo
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course introduces students to attitudes, prayer practices, liturgical variations, and cultural and historical riches of the various branches of Eastern Catholicism. Special attention is also paid to the struggles of some churches to achieve and maintain communion with Rome, and to the theological contributions made by these rites to the common life of the Catholic Church.

Humanities Elective
BUSI418 Business Career Strategies
Friday 12:30–3:20 PM
David Zumaya
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

In this class, students will reflect on their future career goals. Specifically, they will: determine their ideal career goal and put a concrete career plan in place now to accomplish it; learn to network in the professional community that you want to join; create a professional resumé and an equivalent LinkedIn profile, where the student will connect with 100 professionals in their immediate field of interest; form a team of 4-6 students to arrange group meetings with professionals in a field relevant to the student group; get an internship that could transition into a part-time job prior to graduation and into a full-time job after graduation; reflect on their personal strengths and weaknesses; create a personal Plan for Success; and create a 30 second Elevator Pitch.

Business Core
COMM200-1 Business Communications
Friday 12:30–3:20 PM
Vernon Mortensen
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Harvard Business Review Press Business Communication (Harvard Business Essentials) Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1591391135Bring this textbook to our first class meeting

In spring, students choose between two core classes: Business Communications or Advanced College Writing. In summer, students will take whatever course not yet completed.

Show Description

This course will teach students how to write and speak effectively in business and other communication.

University Core
DIGM106 Fundamentals of Game Design
Friday 12:30–3:20 PM
Joe Shoopack
155 L
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Fullerton, Tracy Game Design Workshop 4th Ed Taylor & Francis Group, 2018 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1138098770
Show Description

Comprehensive introduction to basic tools and principles of Game Design including game systems, their components and interaction. Exploration into game analysis and game definitions. Opportunities to conceive an original idea and create a pitch to sell a game concept.

Game DevelopmentMedia Elective
ENTM338 Acting Production: Part 1
Friday 12:30–3:20 PM
Katelyn Slater
155 K
Required Books TBA

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Acting Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Acting Productions meet multiple times a week.

Show Description

This course will give students the opportunity to screen and discuss various content projects with media professionals who played a significant role in the creation or distribution of that content. Each session may include screenings, presentations, or panel discussions with key creative, marketing, or distribution professionals associated with the content screened.

ActingMedia Elective
Must Audition
THEO314-2 Christian Experience IV
Friday 12:30–3:20 PM
Sam Keyes
155 M
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Libreria Editrice Vaticana Catechism of the Catholic Church, English Updated Edition Our Sunday Visitor, Publishing Division, 2020 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1601376497
  2. Mattison, William C Introducing Moral Theology Brazos Press, 2008 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1587432231
  3. Sri, Edward Men, Women, and the Mystery of Love Franciscan Media, 2015 Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1632530806
Show Description

While mainstream 21st century life operates in the arbitrary and meaningless condition that Pope St. John Paul II called a “culture of death,” the Catholic tradition holds out the enduring reality of human nature and its supernatural vocation to beatitude. Starting from Part Three of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, this course introduces the Catholic vision of morality centered on the virtues and the attainment of the beatific vision. In his “theology of the body,” our university’s patron insists that the Catholic view of moral action centers on the meaningfulness of the human body. As such, the course gives special attention to JPII’s teaching on the “nuptial meaning” of the body as an alternative to postmodern voluntarist individualism.

University Core
THEO111Christian Experience ITHEO112Christian Experience IITHEO113Christian Experience III
BUSI425 Sales Workshop
Friday 3:30–6:20 PM
Stephan Haight
155 A/B
Required Books TBA
Show Description

This course builds on courses on sales theory, negotiations & business planning, and to apply these concepts in real world “selling” experiences.

Business Elective
BUSI434Introduction to Applied Selling
COMM200-2 Business Communications
Friday 3:30–6:20 PM
Vernon Mortensen
155 E
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. Harvard Business Review Press Business Communication (Harvard Business Essentials) Buy NowDigital Copies Allowed978-1591391135Bring this textbook to our first class meeting

In spring, students choose between two core classes: Business Communications or Advanced College Writing. In summer, students will take whatever course not yet completed.

Show Description

This course will teach students how to write and speak effectively in business and other communication.

University Core
ENTM437 Musical Production
Friday 6:30–9:20 PM
Angie Bitsko
155 K
Required Textbooks & Materials:
  1. $50 Class Fee.

Important: successfully auditioning for a production does not result in automatic enrollment. To participate, students must also officially register for the class either during Registration Week (for credit) or with an Add/Drop Form (for credit or audit).

"Musical Production" should be used for registration (do not list the play's name).

Acting Productions meet multiple times a week.

Show Description

From first reading through to performance, students rehearse and perform a musical from a classic or contemporary writer. Students must audition to register for this class. This course may be taken multiple times for credit.

6 units
Must Audition
Saturday & More
ENTM●●● Feature Film: Production
George Simon
Required Books TBA

Students registering for the Feature Film will be enrolled in a specific course ID & unit count as follows:

  • Sophomore: ENTM221 — 3 units
  • Junior: ENTM327 — 6 units
  • Senior: ENTM427 — 6 units

Show Description

This course is part of the Feature Film Program. Students apply for specific on-set positions that align with their unique skills and career goals and fulfill that role throughout principle photography on a narrative feature film project. This class may be taken as a 3 unit or 6 unit class based on the student's role and class status.

Media Elective

Please be advised that adjustments in scheduled meeting times and/or instructor assignments may be made at any time without prior notice.

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